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MACHEN 3

ZU LILLY REICH

With Cornelia Falkenhan and Sonja Müller
In cooperation with Frankfurter Kranz - Network of culturally active women in Frankfurt

The workshop discussion MACHEN 3 was devoted to Cornelia Falkenhan's small-format material collages, which the artist and stage designer created as an associative commentary on Lilly Reich.

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MACHEN 3:

ZU LILLY REICH:

With Cornelia Falkenhan and in cooperation with Dr. Sonja Müller from Frankfurter Kranz.

 

The workshop talk is dedicated to the image collages by Cornelia Falkenhan, which the stage designer developed as an artistic commentary on the occasion of the research project on Lilly Reich, and to the early work of Lilli Reich.

Lilly Reich (1885-1947) was a furniture designer, window decorator, fashion designer and trade fair designer. In 1920 she was the first oman to be appointed to the board of the Deutscher Werkbund. From 1924 to 1926 Lilly Reich lived in Frankfurt.

ZU LILLY REICH is a homage that took place over an entire year. Research trips, literary approaches and an installation in the spaces of the Werkbund form a open perspective on the early work of the young designer: her activities in the Werkbund, the exhibition designs for the Frankfurt Fair, the studios for fashion and design in Berlin and Frankfurt in the twenties.

 

Join us for two hours of conversation about Lilli Reich with Cornelia Falkenhan and Sonja Müller and get inspired to create your own image collages.

 

Friday, November 26, 2021 - 6pm to 8pm.

On Friday evening MACHEN 3 ZU LILLY REICH took place, a cooperation with Frankfurter Kranz, Sonja Müller and with Cornelia Falkenhan and guests.  


In contrast to our first workshop talk, which could only take place online because of Corona, we met at the STUDIOSPACE Lange Strasse 31 at the 'round' table.
Sonja Müller wrote about the first MACHEN (with Susan Donath and Vroni Schwegler):
It's about MAKING something that has to do with textiles, about handwork, which is rather seen as a women's domain, and about the idea of doing things together. And about getting into conversation with each other about MAKING. Is that feasible?
And also: MAKING takes time. Time for the production process. This time is a gain. It is time spent together.
In her text, she cites me:
For me, MAKING - in community with others - is like a universe. The question of hand-head coordination, thinking with the hands when material and action begin to create structures that take on a life of their own.... and while we are doing, we MAKE thoughts or are inattentive or allow the doing to release us into a flow. We think about the content references and the like or not. I think of Kleist: On the gradual fabrication of thoughts while talking. MAKING in community opens up dynamic spaces that I can't find alone. Or more difficult. Or different.


And here I am again at the questions that revolve around our workshop conversations. Is this the red thread? What happens when we engage with each other, take a topic as the occasion for exchange, and leave a personal fingerprint in the process?
I watched Cornel West's (American philosopher, political activist, actor) MasterClass this weekend, in which he talks about philosophy - not as an abstract school of thought - but as a practical guide that can help direct our lives. If I consider philosophy and art to be the same, which is not uncommon, people spoke of truth in philosophy and its equivalent in art, beauty, I understand his remarks as inspiring descriptions of what art is ideally capable of achieving. If we accept his definition, we leave a fingerprint of ourselves and our relationship to the world in making art. Through the means of art, we examine what makes us tick, what we think and how we feel, and what makes us distinctive and unique, without underestimating or losing sight of our connection to the greater whole.  If we remain honest with ourselves, we experience the moment of creation as an expression of creative joy, introspection and expression. MAKING 3 was also about sharing time. The gradual making of things while making and the gradual making of thoughts while talking is a perfect combination and invitation to get to know oneself and others and to touch and talk about the things of the world in relation to the moment, to time, material, body and soul.
The two hours at the round table flew by. The carefully selected materials provided arranged by Cornelia and Sonja, uncomplicatedly invited all participants to create their collages, inspired by Cornelia's collages, which in turn were inspired by Lilly Reich's work and the joint research work with Sonja on the occasion of the exhibition TO LILLY REICH at the Werkbund. The collages we created could not be more different, unique and eigensinnig - own minded! I learned a lot from all participants, and thank you all warmly for the inspiring time together.

 

                                                          Supported by Hessische Kulturstiftung - Brückenstipendium
 

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